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Together We Can Convention to address Opioid Addiction

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., will be presenting on the Share Your Story project at the Together We Can Convention on 4/28.

Together We Can Convention

Justice Center for Research being honored at the 2018 Philadelphia Business Journal Faces of Philanthropy Awards

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner’s work on the Share Your Opioid Story project in collaboration with the Independence Blue Cross Foundation is being honored by the 2018 Philadelphia Business Journal Faces of Philanthropy Awards. Congratulations Glenn!

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner presents at Research Unplugged

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. presents "A Comprehensive Criminological Research Agenda to Address the Opioid Crisis" at Research Unplugged in Schlow Library. The event will take place on Thursday April 12th from 12:30-1:30pm in the Downsbrough Community Room. Dr. Sterner’s talk examines three active Justice Center projects that target specific populations associated with the opioid crisis: current opioid users, illegal distributors of opioids, and those who stigmatize opioid addiction.

Criminology Forum 4/13, "Putting the 'Gang' back in Gang Research: Group-level Characteristics of Gangs in the Texas Prison System"

David Pyrooz, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Colorado Boulder, will be our guest speaker for the next Criminology Forum.

"Putting the 'Gang' back in Gang Research: Group-level Characteristics of Gangs in the Texas Prison System"

Date: Friday, April 13
Place: 406 Oswald Tower
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m.

 

Dr. David Pyrooz’s serves as an Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder and as a faculty associate in the Problem Behavior and Positive Youth Development Program in the Institute of Behavioral Science. His research primarily focuses on gangs and criminal networks. In this talk, he will discuss some of his recent work on the group-level characteristics of gangs in the Texas prison system and address the following questions:

 

1) Is it possible to research the group-level characteristics of gangs by relying on the self-reports of gang members?
2) To what extent is there heterogeneity across gangs in their compositional, instrumental, expressive, profit-generation, and communicative features?
3) What explains differences in the group-level characteristics of gangs?

Available online via Zoom:  https://psu.zoom.us/j/976418716

Meeting ID to join: 976 418 716

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Justice Center for Research and the Department of Sociology & Criminology.

Justice Center Director, Derek Kreager and colleagues publish book chapter in Social Networks and the Life Course

“A Life Course and Networks Approach to Prison Therapeutic Communities” was published in the edited volume, Social Networks and the Life Course: Integrating the Development of Human Lives and Social Relational Networks. The chapter discusses the work from the Therapeutic Community Prison Inmate Networks Study (TC-PINS), and ”applies life course and social network perspectives to understand prison TC processes and demonstrate the feasibility and promise of our approach with preliminary findings from a cross-sectional study of a small TC (N = 20) in a maximum-security men’s prison.” Authors include: Derek Kreager, Justice Center Director, Martin Bouchard, Professor at Simon Fraser School of Criminology, George De Leon, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine, David Schaefer, Associate Professor at UC Irvine Sociology, Michaela Soyer, Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Alumni, now at Hunter College, Jacob Young, Associate Professor at ASU School of Criminology & Criminal Justice, and Gary Zajac, Justice Center for Research Managing Director.

Social Networks and the Life Course: Integrating the Development of Human Lives and Social Relational Networks edited volume

Social Networks and the Life Course: Integrating the Development of Human Lives and Social Relational Networks, edited by Duane Alwin, McCourtney Professor of Sociology and Demography and Director of the Center for Life Course and Longitudinal Studies, Diane Felmlee, Professor of Sociology and Justice Center Faculty Affiliate, and Derek Kreager, Justice Center Director and Liberal Arts Professor of Sociology and Criminology, “engages the interface between the development of human lives and social relational networks. It focuses on the integration of two subfields of sociology/social science--the life course and social networks. Research practitioners studying social networks typically focus on social structure or social organization, ignoring the complex lives of the people in those networks. At the same time, life course researchers tend to focus on individual lives without necessarily studying the contexts of social relationships in which lives are embedded and “linked” to one another through social networks. These patterns are changing and this book creates an audience of researchers who will better integrate the two subfields. It covers the role of social networks across the life span, from childhood and adolescence, to midlife, through old age.”

Glenn Sterner discusses opioid crisis with Congressional candidate Marc Friedenberg

Dr. Glenn Sterner, Postdoctoral Scholar in the Justice Center for Research, recently sat down with Congressional candidate Marc Friedenberg to discuss the opioid crisis.  They spoke about the current state of the opioid crisis, how it is affecting Pennsylvania residents, and what can be done through policy to address it. View their discussion here

Penn State Summit on the Opioid Epidemic, 1/12/18 in the HUB

The Penn State Summit on the Opioid Epidemic will take place on January 12th in the HUB-Robeson Center at University Park. The day will include flash talks, discussion with feedback sessions, and an RFA announcement. Lunch will be provided. Register by January 4th.

Register for the event

Apply for a travel grant

Penn State Summit on the Opioid Epidemic image 

Participate in the Share Your Opioid Story project

Telling the Stories of the Opioid Crisis – We want to hear from you

Have you lost a loved one or a friend to an opioid overdose?  Are you in recovery from opioid addiction?  Are you currently struggling with opioid addiction? Are you a grandparent raising a grandchild because your child is battling opioid addiction? Or maybe you have been affected by the opioid epidemic in some other way.

We want to talk to you, because we would like to hear your story. 

Dr. Glenn Sterner from the Justice Center for Research at Penn State University is working to collect the stories of the opioid crisis in our Philadelphia communities. We want to show the human side of the opioid epidemic, how it affects people of all backgrounds, and the impacts it has had on individuals, family members, friends and communities.

We have two goals.  First, we want to reduce the stigma surrounding the crisis and help people to talk about opioid addiction more openly. Second, we want to connect those affected by the opioid crisis, so you can know that you are not alone.  By doing so, we hope to assist those affected in getting the help they desperately need.

If you live in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties, we want to sit down with you and hear your story of how the opioid epidemic has affected your life.  From this interview, we will document your story and post it in on an online website we are in the process of creating that will share your story and the story of others across the Philadelphia region and across Pennsylvania.

If you are interested in sharing your story, please email shareopioidstories@gmail.com or call 814-867-3295.  We will connect with you as soon as possible.  Thank you for your interest.