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University Park Faculty Affiliates

CJRC affiliates are faculty members who have received CJRC support or who are currently conducting research relevant to the CJRC mission. If you are interested in becoming a CJRC faculty affiliate, please send a request and description of how your work relates to the CJRC mission to justicecenter@psu.edu.

Faculty Affiliates

Have received funding or support from the Criminal Justice Research Center in the past 5 years.
Eric Baumer

Eric Baumer

  • Professor of Sociology and Criminology

epb5167@psu.edu

My research and teaching interests fall within the areas of criminology, communities and urban sociology, the sociology of law, and social demography.  I am especially interested in assessing temporal and spatial variation in levels of crime, the mobilization of law, and the application of legal sanctions. 

Diane Felmlee

Diane Felmlee

  • Professor of Sociology

dhf12@psu.edu

Richard Felson

Richard Felson

  • Professor of Criminology and Sociology

rbf7@psu.edu

Sarah Font

Sarah Font

  • Assistant Professor of Sociology

saf252@psu.edu

Martha Gault Sherman

Martha Gault Sherman

  • Lecturer in Sociology and Criminology

meg247@psu.edu

914 Oswald Tower
University Park , PA 16802

Corina Graif

Corina Graif

  • Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology

corina.graif@psu.edu

Allison Harris

Allison Harris

  • Assistant Professor

auh323@psu.edu

John Kramer

John Kramer

  • Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Criminology

jhk@psu.edu

Amy Marshall

Amy Marshall

  • Associate Professor of Psychology

adm11@psu.edu

Eduardo Mendieta

Eduardo Mendieta

  • Professor of Philosophy and Affiliate Professor in the School of International Affairs

ezm5325@psu.edu

Holly Nguyen

Holly Nguyen

  • Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology

hollynguyen@psu.edu

Deirdre O'Sullivan

Deirdre O'Sullivan

  • Assistant Professor of Education

dmo11@psu.edu

327 Cedar Building
University Park , PA 16802
Eric Silver

Eric Silver

  • Professor of Sociology and Criminology

exs44@psu.edu

I study the relationship between morality and crime, deviance, stigma, and criminal-justice related behaviors. My prior work focuses on the relationship between mental disorder and violence/victimization, communities and crime, and risk assessment. I have authored over 50 articles and received awards for both research and teaching.

Jeremy Staff

Jeremy Staff

  • Associate Professor of Criminology and Sociology

jus25@psu.edu

My research and teaching interests lie in criminology, life course studies, and stratification. I study how employment experiences relate to antisocial behavior and school achievement during adolescence and the transition to adulthood. I also study how problem behaviors in the early life course impact later health and wellbeing, educational and labor market attainment, and family formation.

Darrell Steffensmeier

Darrell Steffensmeier

  • Professor of Sociology and Criminology

d4s@psu.edu

Major interests are – First, in theory construction, including development of theories of gender/crime relationship, age/crime relationship, and criminal justice decision making; and a fuller explanation of crime opportunity and its variability by place and population subgroup (e.g. gender or age). Second, in establishing patterns and predictors of crime. Third, in criminal careers and life-course criminality (e.g. pathways, desistance). 

Glenn Sterner

Glenn Sterner

  • Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Abington

ges5098@psu.edu

Glenn Sterner received his PhD in Rural Sociology from The Pennsylvania State University. His main research agenda is focused on the application of social network analysis in understanding dark (illicit and illegal) and gray (covert) networks. His dissertation examined and documented the use of social networks in community organizing processes in four municipalities. His current projects include the examination of opiate abuse networks, illegal opiate distribution, and community-police networks to address the opiate epidemic. Please visit the Justice Center’s site Addressing the Opiate Epidemic to learn more about these projects. Glenn is examining the use of social network analysis techniques to address deception in intelligence on terrorism activity. Finally, he is actively engaged in research on the networks of child and human trafficking and cyber aggression on Twitter.

Glenn is also interested in the scholarship of engagement and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He is actively developing a Public Scholarship Consortium to enable the connection of scholars and practitioners across disciplines dedicated to collaboration with communities in knowledge creation initiatives that address public issues and are publicly accessible. This Consortium will be launched in summer of 2017.

Recent publications have been featured in the International Journal for Rural Law and Policy and American Journal of Community Psychology. Prior to his graduate work at The Pennsylvania State University, Glenn received an M.A. and B.S. from Michigan State University.

Glenn is currently an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Penn State Abington.

Jeffery Ulmer

Jeffery Ulmer

  • Professor of Sociology and Criminology
  • Associate Head, Department of Sociology and Criminology

jtu100@psu.edu

My research interests span the sociology of criminal punishment, criminological theory, religion and crime, and racial/ethnic inequality and violence rates.  More broadly, I have expertise in social psychology, organizations, symbolic interactionism, and the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods. 

Ashton Verdery

Ashton Verdery

  • Assistant Professor of Sociology and Demography

amv5430@psu.edu

My research focuses on social networks: how and why people are socially connected to each other and the consequences of those connections. Within this broad area, I am especially interested in demographic processes, specifically how population dynamics shape family, kinship, and social networks and how those networks in turn affect health and other population processes. I have given special attention to migration and the network ties that migrants retain to origin areas after moving as well as the new ties they form in different destinations. I am also very interested in using social networks as a basis for sampling populations that are otherwise difficult to survey, including migrants, those at high risk of sexually transmitted or blood-borne infections, and opioid users. In this line of research, I am working on new ways to use and improve network based sampling methods, especially respondent-driven sampling.

Martha Wadsworth

Martha Wadsworth

  • Associate Professor of Psychology

mew27@psu.edu

Martha Wadsworth’s research program aims to develop a rich, contextual understanding of how children in poverty adapt to their difficult life circumstances. Through a biologically informed stress-and-coping lens, Dr. Wadsworth’s work focuses on identifying individual, family, and community strengths that promote positive outcomes for youths exposed to poverty-related stress and trauma. She also develops and evaluates youth, family, school, and community-level interventions that target these strengths and assets rather than deficits.